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formidable. can you win back the white house of hillary clinton is a nominee? >> sure. she is formidable, -- >> she is popular. >> whoever is the nominee would have to make the case of, do we want policies of the past or something fresh? >> that is the message. >> if you like, do not stop thinking about tomorrow is when bill clinton was talking about with fleetwood mac. maybe it is time to put somebody new in. >> folder you today? >> i am 45. >> you will be 47. hillary clinton will be about 70 years old. big difference. >> bobby jindal is in his 40's. a great speech last month from kissinger who can still look for a great punchline. we were so impressed. i said to the person sitting next to me, he realized that bobby jindal and i combined are still younger and henry kissinger. >> one thing i was struck by during the campaign, governor romney was a transitional figure between an older generation, baby boomers generation and the 40 somethings. they increasingly dominate gop politics. one of those figures as paul ryan. you talk to him a lot. is his future in the house or do you think he wan
ones people raise. what they miss, is what would bill clinton have been without a second term. it wasn't the lewinsky issue that matters in the end but when he left office we had a surplus and that the triangulation worked and was able to have a balanced budget and couldn't have done it without a second term. we don't dwell on ronald reagan's iran-contra debacle. the fact of the matter is reagan's great diplomacy with mikhail gorbachev, margaret thatcher said reagan won the cold war without firing a single shot and occurred because reagan is taking the trips and meeting with gorbachev to end the cold war. but the point i'm making is this notion of the division of first and second terms and all the polls we see is a little bit overwrought. if second terms were so bad, f.d.r. woopt have had a third or fourth there is truth you lose some of your l.s.u.er in the sense barack obama won't run again and people realize his power is limited, his clock is running so it's sometimes harder to do legislative deals in the second term, on the other hand, barack obama can sign executive order after ex
closely with mrs. clinton in deciding about the colors, the designs that would go on the service, how those particular colors would looked in the various settings in the state dining room are the east room. i do remember mrs. clinton's mother was living in the house at the time. she would come to some of these little meetings about showing samples from the porcelain factory. none of them seem to be satisfactory. she said of in the bathroom of my suite is a beautiful yellow color. she said i think we should try that yellow color. so we got a sample of the wallpaper and sent it off to lennox, and they did some samples, and it worked out beautifully. i think that was mrs. rodham's legacy in terms of state dinners. [laughter] >> let's go to looking at the transitions into the white house that a family makes and the transitions out as well. often, for a president, he has been running for office for a couple of years and he is a political person who has most likely been at the white house numerous times, but in coming into the white house, the first ladies really have not spent much time. w
was in the majority party. speaker gingrich was the speaker. he worked with then-president bill clinton. we balanced the budget five of those fourteen years. it meant that there was compromise. this requires compromise. this requires republicans stepping forward with some ideas about how to keep essential services of government running at the level that people have been accustomed to. this is not rocket science. this is people coming together the way that other congresses have done to solve big issues. i suggest that my former colleagues on the republican side go see the movie "lincoln," because in the movie "lincoln," it shows how hard it was back then to get things done. but what lincoln did is he gathered people around him the way that i believe president obama is doing by calling republicans, talking to them, trying to work with them. and when that happens, big things get solved. the fiscal cliff got solved because people started talking to one another. so this can happen again. yes, ma'am. >> yes, have your phones been ringing from members of the public? and if so, what are they saying? >> i'm
to anything like that but it is was remarkable that he was one of the 4,000 a day according to the clinton justice department that do use a firearm in self-defense. obviously, he is pretty happy he was able to do so. >> next call comes from alabama. caller: good morning, sir. i'm a first time caller. appreciate c-span. my comments or issues are is that the majority of these people are talking about second amendment rights. they have to realize that the second amendment was written years and years ago. things do get amended. the people who we put there to control these laws, they are being controlled by lobbyists, the n.r.a. ena other groups also. let's see if we can contribute to these congressman and other people, who is going to protect us instead of doing what they want to do. guest: well, i think the caller is making an argument that is frequently made by people who have questions about the second amendment. yeah, the second amendment was written in the 18th century. so was the first amendment. yes, many years have gone by and firearms have developmented, technology has changed but we
. >> for your time back in the state department in the clinton years, you were involved in the early efforts -- i don't know if you have any lessons on the approaches that were tried then. >> i think we made a certain number of mistakes. it was me. so what did we really learn? i think the most important lesson was that you cannot negotiate a treaty unless you're prepared to do stuff at home to meet the requirements. and i think it wasn't enough thinking on what it is that the u.s. is prepared to do domestically before it was negotiated. then, of course, we had other reasons that it was never submitted to the senate and so on and so on. i think we were great at the negotiations but it did not mean anything because we did not have a program here to get it implemented. the other lesson, again, i'm partly the problem here. we just sort of come off the protocol which was a successful international agreement. we thought we should model a climate change agreement on that, do in the same way, have it be top-down, set targets. but more mon tree yawl -- mon tri albut we followed the same model because
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6